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We love color

Gems - sapphires and rubies

Learn more about exquisite
gemstones in many colors

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Corundums

Sapphires and rubies are color variations of the mineral corundum. On the Mohs scale of mineral hardness, this mineral has a hardness of 9 and is thus the second hardest mineral after diamond.

Corundum is an allochromatic gem stone with traces of chromium, titanium and iron that are responsible for the many different colors.

Corundum exist in blue, green, red, yellow, violet and orange tones and combinations of those. All colorless and colorful variations are allocated to the sapphire group, the only exception being the red ruby.

The fascination of sapphires and rubies are set off nicely when they are facet-cut. As they then sparkle beautifully.

Ring with pink safir

The names Sapphires and Rubies

The name sapphire stems from the Latin term “sapphirus”, which derives from the Greek “sappheiros”. This means “blue”. The term also exists in Hebrew (“Sappir”), in the Old Iranian language (“Sani-prijam”) and in Sanskrit (“Shani Priya”). In these languages, it means “love for Saturn” and refers to the planet Saturn.

The name ruby comes from the Latin term “rubens”, which means “red”. Rubies have probably been revered for more than 2,000 years.

Ring with blue safir

Blue Sapphire

Its color, standing for serenity, purity and peace, makes it a coveted jewel. The blue sapphire is a star – at the latest since Princess Diana’s engagement ring, which is now worn by Kate.

The most important sapphire deposits are in Sri Lanka and India. Further deposits are located in the US, Australia, Nigeria and Madagascar.

The “Star of Adam” is the largest sapphire ever found and boasts 1,404 carat. It was discovered in Sri Lanka and has an estimated value of about EUR 90 million.

The “Star of India” with a weight of 563.35 carat is the largest faceted sapphire in the world. It is on display in the American Museum of Natural History.

The most exclusive blues are found in the cornflower blue sapphires and in the intensively blue Kashmir sapphire.

The sapphire is the birthstone for the month of September.

Rings with pink safir
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Yellow Sapphire

Yellow sapphires are beautiful and precious gemstones. They are not as well-known as blue sapphires but their yellow color lends them a very warm hue.

Combine yellow sapphires with white precious metals and you will get modern pieces of jewelry that are highly versatile. In combination with yellow precious metals, the yellow sapphire reminds us of the sun.

Yellow stands for light and life. In China, yellow is the color of harmony and wisdom.

The pink to yellow-orange Padparadadscha sapphire is particularly special. Its color reminds us of lotus flowers.

Rosegold ring with yellow safir
Available colors of Safir

Available Color

Pink Sapphire

Pink and rose are the colors of women. They have a positive and invigorating effect and enhance conscious experience and feeling.

These colors can always accompany you in a particularly precious form with the help of our pink and rose sapphires.

In combination with rose gold, they make for wonderfully romantic pieces of jewelry. And combining them with white precious metals lends them a slightly cooler appeal.

The dividing line between the pink sapphire and the ruby is blurred, as the gems come in a myriad of shades.

Rings with pink safir

Ruby

With its deep-red color, the ruby is not only the birthstone for the month of July but above all the jewel of love, passion and romance.

Together with the green emerald, the blue sapphire and the diamond, the ruby is one of the classic four major gemstones.

Rubies have been discovered on almost all continents. But the most important countries of origin are Myanmar, Thailand and Sri Lanka. Sri Lanka is one of the oldest known origins.

The “Mogok Sun” ruby, which was found in 1993 in Myanmar and has still not been cut, has an unbelievable size of 1,734 carat. Other well-known rubies are the “Edward Ruby” with a size of 167 carat, which is on display at the British Museum of Natural History, London, the “Rosser Reeves Ruby” ruby weighing 138.7 carat and the “DeLong Star Ruby” with 100.3 carat.

As the pure shades of red are very rare, the ruby is one of the rarest gemstones in the world.

Ring with red rubin

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